Support & Security

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Trusted contact

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Market and Holidays opening hours

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What is MFA and why does Avenue ask for confirmation of access each time I log in?

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Checking your registered email

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Contact us

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What is a Good Faith Violation (GFV)?

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What is Street Name?

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Registration of shares in the United States

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What is the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC)?

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What happens if Avenue fails or closes?

01

Trusted contact

We offer you the opportunity to list a trusted contact while signing up, should your contact information become out of date, or if you become disabled. Collecting this information is purely preventive and does not alter your Avenue experience.

This contact is not mandatory, but it is recommended. Click here to learn more: FINRA – Trusted contact

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02

Market and Holidays opening hours

The US stock market opens at 11:30 am and closes at 6:00 pm – (BRT – Brasília Time)
You can send orders at any time during or after business hours but will only be executed during market hours. Outside of business hours, Stop or Limited orders are accepted. Check here the complete list of market holidays: NASDAQ – Stock Market holidays
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03

What is MFA and why does Avenue ask for confirmation of access each time I log in?

Multi factor authentication (MFA) adds another layer of security to your account.

It is a safer option because it requires two sources of verification: something you know (your password) and something you have (your phone).
In this case it is more difficult for a hacker to gain access to these two information, so we recommend using two factors to protect your account at all times. Check the security tab.

The MFA is always sent via SMS. If not, you can request by whatsapp or call (voice).

Make sure your phone number is entered correctly and that you are using a cell phone number, not a home phone number.

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04

Checking your registered email

Your registered email at Avenue, in addition to being an access key, it is our main communication channel.

Make sure that your email is always up to date and that you do not have any blockage to receive important communications from the broker and clearing house.

If we have reason to believe that your email is incorrect, your account may be temporarily restricted until we can confirm your correct email address for safety reasons.

In this case, you will receive a notification via SMS requesting to update your email address. Prolonged problems with your email address can result in an account restriction.

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05

Contact us

Our service is available Monday through Friday from 10:00 am to 7:00 PM, (Brasília time) via chat, phone and email.
Our service follows the standard calendar of US national holidays, and will always be available on stock exchange trading days (NYSE and NASDAQ).
+1 (786) 220-7233 (US)
+55 11 4380-7897 (Sao Paulo)
4005-1108 (Capitals and metropolitan regions)
0800-760-0330 (Other regions)
Whatsapp: +1 (786) 633-0988
Chat: self-service available every day of the week. Agents available Monday through Friday from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm (Brasília time).
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06

What is a Good Faith Violation (GFV)?

“Good Faith Violation” – (watch our explanatory video below) occurs in situations where you buy a title and sell it before paying in full for the initial purchase with funds settled. Only cash or proceeds from the sale of fully paid securities qualify as “liquidated funds”. Selling a position before it is paid out of liquidated funds is considered a “breach of good faith” because no good faith effort was made to deposit additional money into the account prior to the settlement date. The following examples illustrate situations that may incur violations in good faith.

IMPORTANT! Accounts with three “Good Faith Violations” in a period of 12 (twelve) months will be restricted to the purchase of securities with cash settled for a period of 90 days.

Example 1:
Available money = $ 0
On Monday morning, a customer sells Y shares, receiving US$ 5,000 in account funds.
On Monday afternoon, the customer buys X shares for US$ 5,000
If shares X are sold before Wednesday (settlement date of the sale of Y), there will be a breach in good faith, since shares X are not considered fully paid before the sale.

Example 2:
Available money = US$ 5,000
On Monday morning, a purchase is made for US$ 5,000 of share X.
On Monday at noon, the customer sells stock X for US$ 5,500
Near the market close, the customer buys $ 5,500 of share Y.
At this point, no good faith violation occurred because the customer had sufficient funds to purchase X.
If Y is sold before it is paid (liquidation), a violation of “Good Faith” will have occurred.

Example 3:
Available money = US$ 10,000
Unpaid cash sale credit = US$ 5,000
(referring to the sale made on Friday – settlement on Tuesday / T+2)
On Monday morning, the customer buys US$ 15,000 of share Y.
A breach of “Good Faith” occurs if that customer sells share Y on Monday.
The purchase is not considered fully paid because the US$ 5,000 is not considered sufficient funds until it is paid off on Tuesday.
For more information visit: INVESTOR ALERTS AND BULLETINS

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07

What is Street Name?

Brokerage or clearing firms usually hold street name titles due to the complexity of tracking each stock certificate for each individual. Almost all brokers hold securities electronically, without physical certificates.

The holding of individual titles in street name is done for several reasons, we highlight the two main reasons:

Convenience: it is much more convenient for brokers to carry securities on their behalf, as securities can be easily transferred between parties. Imagine the additional amount of work that would take place if the actions were individually on behalf of each customer. Every time the customer needed to sell shares, the broker would have to find the exact shares he owns and deliver them to the buyer, who would then have to send the shares back to the company so that the name on the certificates would be changed to the new one. owners name. By keeping bonds in street name, the broker can avoid most delays associated with the transfer of ownership and quickly settle trades.

Security: If brokers had physical security certificates, there would be an increased risk of physical damage, loss and theft. By keeping them in street name, brokers are able to retain securities electronically, effectively reducing the likelihood of any problems occurring. This security is also extended to payment security. By keeping the bonds in street name, the broker is ensuring that a bond will be delivered immediately when a transaction occurs. This eliminates any uncertainty that would exist if the customer was responsible for delivering security each time a transaction occurred.

You can read more at: FINRA – ITS YOUR STOCK, JUST NOT YOUR NAME: EXPLANING STREET NAMES

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08

Registration of shares in the United States

The assets of a brokerage account remain under the name of the broker, rather than the name of the individual who is the legal owner of a security.

Although the name on a certificate is not that of the individual, he is still listed as the actual owner and beneficiary and has the rights associated with the asset.

In many cases, when you buy or sell securities at an American broker, your name is not actually on the stock or bond certificate. The name that appears on the certificate is that of the broker, and this is called in the USA “Street Name”.

In this way, whenever a client needs to buy or sell shares, the broker is readily able to allocate a portion of its position as needed.

You can read more at: FINRA – ITS YOUR STOCK, JUST NOT YOUR NAME: EXPLANING STREET NAMES

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09

What is the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC)?

SIPC is a non-profit organization created in 1970 under the Securities Investor Protection Act (SIPA) that provides limited coverage to investors in their brokerage accounts in the event that a broker becomes insolvent. All broker dealers that do business with the investing public must be members of the SIPC. The protection of the SIPC is limited. It covers the replacement of missing shares and other securities up to (the maximum of) US$ 500,000, with a maximum of US$ 250,000 in cash.

This protection is only used when a company is deactivated due to financial circumstances in which the customer’s assets are absent – due to theft, conversion or unauthorized trading – or are at risk because of the company’s failure.

Avenue Securities is a member of the SIPC.

More information is available upon request on the SIPC website

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10

What happens if Avenue fails or closes?

By regulation, Avenue is a member of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC), a corporation which protects its members’ securities clients for up to US$500,000 (including US$250,000 in cash payment requests). You can check out Avenue’s registration at www.sipc.org. If you are non-US customer, your cash balance may be held by an affiliate of Avenue Securities.
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